Two Nottingham students have revealed how they are coping with the sudden switch to online teaching amid the pandemic.

Following the Prime Minister’s public address on March 23 , all face-to-face lectures and seminars have been suspended to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

Most British universities including Nottingham Trent University and University of Nottingham have closed campuses and moved online to ensure that their students’ learning experience goes on.

Radka Feichtingerova, 23

Radka Feichtingerova, is in her final year of the MA Magazine Journalism degree course at NTU, she says that except for having to motivate herself to stay focused at home, she has adapted well to virtual teaching.

” I really do appreciate that they are trying to keep us busy and that they try to deliver lectures as they would in person”
Radka Feichtingerova, NTU student

In fact, she thinks the online experience could enhance her career chances:

The 23-year-old international student from Czech Republic said that new arrangements to assessments put her ease.

”I really do appreciate that they are trying to keep us busy and that they try to deliver lectures the way they would in person.”

Following a students’ petition with more than 7,000 signatures, both Nottingham universities have introduced new policies to ensure that students’ grades would not be negatively affected under such unprecendeted times.

Radka Feichtingerova working on assessments from home

 

Priscilla Manu Djan, is a third year medical student at University of Nottingham. She described her first reaction to the news about online teaching in three words: ”shock, confusion and dilemma.”

Priscilla Manu Djan, 22

She had just began a four month Clinical Phase 1 placement at Lincoln County Hospital in early March, only to have it interrupted by the lockdown, and need for social distancing.  Now, it will be progressing in a different way:

 

”If it wasn’t for online teaching, we wouldn’t have anything at all.”
Priscilla Manu djan, UON student

 

Lincoln County Hospital (Image: United Lincolnshire Hospitals)

Work experience are a vital part of her medical training.  The 22-year-old student hopes the transition will not carry on for too long. She added: ”If it wasn’t for online teaching, we wouldn’t have anything at all”.

Professor Sarah O’ Hara, is the Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Education and Student Experience at the University of Nottingham.  She told the local media outlet,  Nottinghamshire Live, that she appreciated all 30,000 students ”for their patience and understanding and for working with us to make this a success.”

Professor Sarah O’Hara, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Education and Student Experience (Image: University of Nottingham)

Any students requiring support from either of the Nottingham universities with their online learning experience, should visit either NTU or UON‘s websites.