We are in the midst of Dry January, a campaign to raise money for charities, which encourages people go sober for the month. It is estimated one in six of us are taking part this year.

As many as 135 thousand people in Nottinghamshire will be taking part in Dry January. Many of those taking part are donating to Cancer Research.

Participant Jaspreet Burai, who is a student in Nottingham student, says she’s finding the challenge hard.

 

Alcohol Concern say that more than 300 people have died from alcohol related diseases in the UK so far since the start of 2017. The charity revealed that 93,500 babies under one live with a parent who has a drink problem.

Already £17m has been raised through the campaign since it started in 2013. Major pub chains have announced they are going to stock non-alcoholic beer in response to the demand from customers during this month.

Alcohol Concern’s Dry January Results 2016:

  • 79% of participants saved money
  • 62% of participants had better sleep and more energy
  • 49% of participants lost weight

“POSITIVE IMPACTS ON BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS, BLOOD PRESSURE AND THE LIVER”
DRINK CONCERN, ORGANISERS OF DRY JANUARY

 

Drink Concern believes there are many other positives from abstaining from alcohol.

A spokesperson said: “The most popular benefits people feel during the first couple of week is having more energy and sleeping better. This is because alcohol stops the body from getting the proper deep sleep we all need. Although having a drink can often make people nod off, it causes disrupted and light sleeping.

“More recently, research from the Royal Free Hospital in London has shown that there’s not only positive effects on the outside, but also positive physiological effects from doing a Dry January.

“The study, taken on moderate drinkers, has shown improvements in concentration and sleep patterns, as well as positive impacts on blood sugar levels, blood pressure and the liver.”