Nottinghamshire Fire Service has warned residents about candle safety in the run up to Christmas with more potentially fatal naked flames being used as decoration in the festive season.

Last year, 11 people died from fires started by candles in Nottinghamshire with 350 people estimated to be killed in the UK by candle fires each year – proving that awareness is vital.

With just under a month to go until Christmas, decorations being set up around the home could pose a risk if left unattended.

“CHRISTMAS TREES CAN GO UP IN FLAMES IN A COUPLE OF SECONDS”
DEAN GILLEN, NOTTS FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE

Crew Manager for Nottinghamshire’s Fire and Rescue Service, Dean Gillen, said “Candles are more prevalent during Christmas. We’ve all seen the adverts where Christmas Trees can go up in flames in a couple of seconds.

Around this time, a lot of people are drinking alcohol as well. We’re asking people to put out their candles in water as soon as they begin drinking.”

Dean Gillen encourages use of artificial candles this Christmas

Any naked flame left unattended poses a potential danger to anyone in the building and there are also some candles that are more of a hazard than others.

Teresa Palmer, an independent consultant for the company Partylite, said “Jar candles are more dangerous since they’re surrounded by glass and as the flame gets near the glass, there is a chance that the candle could explode.

“We give all of our customers a ‘candle care leaflet’ when they purchase candles and we demonstrate how the products work as well.”

Safety advice published by the government to people who are planning to use candles this Christmas include burning candles in a well ventilated room, making sure they’re out of the reach of children and not moving lit candles.

Candle Safety Week runs from the 23rd-29th November this year.

MORE CANDLE SAFETY ADVICE

• Never leave burning candles unattended
• Make sure that your smoke alarm is tested regularly
• Put scented candles in a heat resistant holder
• Don’t burn multiple candles close together since flames can flare